Notes on “Haskell Programming – from first principles”

From November, 13th 2017 to June, 9th 2018, a friend and I were working our way through the 1285 pages of “Haskell Programming – from first principles” by Christopher Allen and Julie Moronuki. That’s more than six pages per day! While reading and discussing, I took a few notes here and there, which I want to publish in this post. Some of the sentences are directly taken from the book, which I highly recommend to anyone who wants to learn Haskell, by the way. Continue reading Notes on “Haskell Programming – from first principles”

Digital-Piano Dashboard

I have recently acquired a digital piano. Other than playing it, I have spent some time processing and visualizing its MIDI output data. What’s that? The digital piano has a USB port for data streaming (while somebody is playing). This data contains among other things information about what key is being pushed at a given time. The Digital-Piano Dashboard visualizes that information and renders a nice piano-key-push-history. Continue reading Digital-Piano Dashboard

Haskell BNF Parser

This is a brief update about a project I have been working on lately. It’s my first bigger Haskell project, and about parsing a Backus-Naur form (BNF) expression and returning it in JSON format. More formally, this can be seen as compilation between two languages, namely BNF and JSON. Continue reading Haskell BNF Parser

Corsairs3D

Corsairs3D is a riveting single player game that puts you into a pirate’s shoes. Your ship sails around an island, defended by brave guards, with the goal being, to collect as many coins as possible. But watch out: The defense tour’s cannons are pointing your way. If you do not change course quickly enough, your ship might sink. Continue reading Corsairs3D

Connecting PyCharm to a TensorFlow Docker Container

This guide walks you through setting up PyCharm Professional and Docker, with the goal of developing TensorFlow applications in PyCharm, while executing the code inside of an encapsulated container. After completing the following steps, you will be able to write Python code in PyCharm, and have the execution take place on a container, without any complication. Continue reading Connecting PyCharm to a TensorFlow Docker Container

MOV is Turing-Complete: 4-bit Adder Implementation

In late 2017, small groups of our class were given the task to delve into the assembly language and write a program for the 8051 microcontroller, as part of the Low-Level Programming lecture. This post documents the project MOV is Turing-Complete: 4-bit Adder Implementation — an assembly program that adds two 4-bit numbers relying solely on mov instructions. The appendix lists the minified version of the code. Continue reading MOV is Turing-Complete: 4-bit Adder Implementation

TeX Math to Image Conversion

This post functions as a quick development update on the Math to Image Conversion Bot (on Telegram), the TeX math to image conversion tool (at tools.timodenk.com), and the API that serves them both. The objective is to convert TeX math-code into images. Continue reading TeX Math to Image Conversion

Digit Span Test (Online Tool)

The digit span test is a way of measuring the storage capacity of a person’s working memory: A testperson is visually or auditorily exposed to a sequence of digits one after the other. Right afterwards, the test subject has to recall the correct digits in the same order. Most people manage to recap around seven digits. I have written an online tool that lets the user determine their digit span test score. It is available at the website tools.timodenk.com/digit-span-test. Continue reading Digit Span Test (Online Tool)

SAPUI5 Custom Data Type: IBAN

SAP’s web technology SAPUI5 allows the definition of custom data types. They can be used to format and validate input fields. This example defines an IBAN data type which validates an IBAN checksum using JavaScript code. The second section of this post explains how an IBAN checksum is computed. Continue reading SAPUI5 Custom Data Type: IBAN

Commute Time Tracking

According to the U.S. Census Bureau the average commute time for U.S. citizens who are neither working at home, nor walking or biking to work, is 25.9 minutes. My commute time from Karlsruhe to SAP is usually about 38 minutes one-way; often protracted by traffic jams. However, these can be avoided by departing at times where rush-hour traffic has not fully built up yet. But which departure time works best? Is it 07:00 or rather 09:00? When departing at 07:40 how much time could one save by departing just ten minutes earlier? In addition to the traffic conditions on the outbound trip, the delay on the way back has to be taken into account likewise. With about 9 hours and 20 minutes spent at work, the traffic at 16:20 matters for a departure at 07:00. For a 09:00 departure it would be 18:20. Continue reading Commute Time Tracking